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Please use the form on the right to contact us.  We strive to return all emails and phone calls within 24 hours, 7 days a week.  Be sure to include the best method for contacting you.  Thank you!

 

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Commander Shea Blvd
Quincy, MA 02171
USA

617-767-1065

At Frawley Tax and Consulting Services, we understand the value of not only excellent client service, but also developing strong, lasting relationships.  We perform both individual and business tax returns and tax planning, and at very competitive rates.  We understand and appreciate the importance of building trust, and recognize the difficulty in choosing a competent CPA that you feel comfortable speaking with both candidly, and confidently.   

Our services include Individual and Business Tax return filings, including FREE tax planning based on your anticipated future tax position, to minimize your overall tax liability.  We also offer a variety of additional business services at a great value.  Whether you want to outsource your QuickBooks bookkeeping and payroll services for a reasonable price to focus on your core business, or need help with budgeting, forecasting, or marketing, we are here to help. 

Our marketing services include performing an in-depth industry and company analysis, developing a marketing plan, creating an integrated website, brochures, business cards, company logo, and more.

 

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Patent Information

Background information about patents, the US Patent Office, Applying for a Patent, and notable patent holders.  Frawley Financial Services, CPA has several business partners, and can put you in touch with an appropriate attorney locally.  Frawley Financial Services is located in Naples, FL.

The US Patent and Trade Office is the federal agency for granting U.S. patents and registering trademarks. In doing this, the USPTO fulfills the mandate of Article I, Section 8, Clause 8, of the Constitution that the legislative branch "promote the progress of science and the useful arts by securing for limited times to inventors the exclusive right to their respective discoveries.

The procedure for granting patents, requirements placed on the patentee, and the extent of the exclusive rights vary widely between countries according to national laws and international agreements. Typically, however, a granted patent application must include one or more claims that define the invention. A patent may include many claims, each of which defines a specific property right. These claims must meet relevant patentability requirements, such as novelty and non-obviousness. The exclusive right granted to a patentee in most countries is the right to prevent others from making, using, selling, importing, or distributing a patented invention without permission.

Under the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, patents should be available in WTO member states for any invention, in all fields of technology, and the term of protection available should be a minimum of twenty years.  Nevertheless, there are variations on what is patentable subject matter from country to country.


Thomas Edison secured over 1,000 patents during this lifetime.  Read more about Thomas Edison here, and see a listing of Edison's Patents here.


Enforcement

Patents can generally only be enforced through civil lawsuits (for example, for a U.S. patent, by an action for patent infringement in a United States federal court), although some countries ) have criminal penalties for wanton infringement. Typically, the patent owner seeks monetary compensation for past infringement, and seeks an injunction that prohibits the defendant from engaging in future acts of infringement. To prove infringement, the patent owner must establish that the accused infringer practices all the requirements of at least one of the claims of the patent. (In many jurisdictions the scope of the patent may not be limited to what is literally stated in the claims, for example due to the doctrine of equivalents).

An accused infringer has the right to challenge the validity of the patent allegedly being infringed in a counter-suit. A patent can be found invalid on grounds described in the relevant patent laws, which vary between countries. Often, the grounds are a subset of requirements for patentability in the relevant country. Although an infringer is generally free to rely on any available ground of invalidity (such as a prior publication, for example), some countries have sanctions to prevent the same validity questions being relitigated. An example is the UK Certificate of contested validity.

Patent licensing agreements are contracts in which the patent owner (the licensor) agrees to grant the licensee the right to make, use, sell, and/or import the claimed invention, usually in return for a royalty or other compensation. It is common for companies engaged in complex technical fields to enter into multiple license agreements associated with the production of a single product. Moreover, it is equally common for competitors in such fields to license patents to each other under cross-licensing agreements in order to share the benefits of using each others' patented inventions.

Ownership

In most countries, both natural persons and corporate entities may apply for a patent. In the United States, however, only the inventor(s) may apply for a patent although it may be assigned to a corporate entity subsequently and inventors may be required to assign inventions to their employers under an employment contract. In most European countries, ownership of an invention may pass from the inventor to their employer by rule of law if the invention was made in the course of the inventor's normal or specifically assigned employment duties, where an invention might reasonably be expected to result from carrying out those duties, or if the inventor had a special obligation to further the interests of the employer's company.

The inventors, their successors or their assignees become the proprietors of the patent when and if it is granted. If a patent is granted to more than one proprietor, the laws of the country in question and any agreement between the proprietors may affect the extent to which each proprietor can exploit the patent. For example, in some countries, each proprietor may freely license or assign their rights in the patent to another person while the law in other countries prohibits such actions without the permission of the other proprietor(s).

The ability to assign ownership rights increases the liquidity of a patent as property. Inventors can obtain patents and then sell them to third parties. The third parties then own the patents and have the same rights to prevent others from exploiting the claimed inventions, as if they had originally made the inventions themselves.


For more information, visit the US PATENT AND TRADE OFFICE Online Now.  The detailed process of applying for a trademark and patent are detailed on their website.  If you need assistance, feel free to contact us at any time!  Thank you and we look forward to speaking with you!

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